Baseball Field Restored at Jackie Robinson’s Alma Mater

Photo by Nick Ostiller / Outlook At the dedication ceremony for the renovated John Muir High School baseball field, named after Jackie Robinson, are (from left) Stan Kasten, president and CEO of the Los Angeles Dodgers; Rich Webster, board member of the Helen and Will Webster Foundation; Brad Ratliff, president of the Tournament of Roses; Bill Flinn, executive director of the Tournament of Roses; and Patrick Conyers,  executive director of the Pasadena Educational Foundation.
Photo by Nick Ostiller / Outlook
At the dedication ceremony for the renovated John Muir High School baseball field, named after Jackie Robinson, are (from left) Stan Kasten, president and CEO of the Los Angeles Dodgers; Rich Webster, board member of the Helen and Will Webster Foundation; Brad Ratliff, president of the Tournament of Roses; Bill Flinn, executive director of the Tournament of Roses; and Patrick Conyers, executive director of the Pasadena Educational Foundation.

“A life is not important except in the impact it has on other lives.”

These are the poignant words of Jackie Robinson, one of the most significant pioneers in the history of a country founded by them. Before he became the first African-American to play major-league baseball, persevering through prejudice to pave the way for countless others in every walk of life, Robinson grew up right here on these Pasadena streets. Continue reading “Baseball Field Restored at Jackie Robinson’s Alma Mater”

A Hoop of Hope Brightens Lives at Homeless Facility

On a recent afternoon at Door of Hope’s transitional apartment complex, several children who have been left homeless as a result of domestic violence emerged from their living quarters and stepped outside into the fresh air. Many reside here with their mothers and usually don’t venture beyond the building’s walls for security reasons. On this day, though, a surprise awaited them in the facility’s side yard. Continue reading “A Hoop of Hope Brightens Lives at Homeless Facility”

John Naber’s Olympian Task of Inspiring Others

John Naber was a junior in high school when he stepped onto the diving board and began bouncing up and down. The 16-year-old’s coach didn’t care too much for this brand of horseplay, not when the 1972 swim season was scheduled to begin the following day. Naber reluctantly prepared to end the fun by jumping into the water, but couldn’t leap forward because lane lines had already been strung across the pool, including one directly underneath him. So he aimed to the side, unaware that his antics were about to ensure that the wobbly board gave him an extra, unwanted boost. Continue reading “John Naber’s Olympian Task of Inspiring Others”