Door of Hope Swings Open for Gala on Feb. 20

Door of Hope will celebrate 30 years of helping Pasadena homeless families rebuild their lives at a gala on Feb. 20. Pictured are Door of Hope board members, supporters and staff, including (front row, from left) Jim Howe, Bob Joe, Congresswoman Judy Chu, Door of Hope founders Steve and Iris Lazarian, and Door of Hope Executive Director Tim Peters (far right). Back: George Rothwell, Greg Waybright, Gil Gazanian and Jeremy Rose.
Door of Hope will celebrate 30 years of helping Pasadena homeless families rebuild their lives at a gala on Feb. 20. Pictured are Door of Hope board members, supporters and staff, including (front row, from left) Jim Howe, Bob Joe, Congresswoman Judy Chu, Door of Hope founders Steve and Iris Lazarian, and Door of Hope Executive Director Tim Peters (far right). Back: George Rothwell, Greg Waybright, Gil Gazanian and Jeremy Rose.

For the past 30 years, Door of Hope in Pasadena has stood as a beacon of optimism in the community, helping homeless families rebuild their lives through a variety of resources. Nearly 1,500 individuals who once lived on the streets have found better futures as a result of their experience at the Christian faith-based transitional housing service. This concept of looking ahead toward a brighter tomorrow is one of the nonprofit’s primary pillars. It makes sense, then, that instead of focusing on the past three decades of success, Door of Hope is choosing to celebrate what’s to come in the next 30 years and beyond at the organization’s upcoming gala on Feb. 20. Continue reading “Door of Hope Swings Open for Gala on Feb. 20”

After Foster Care, Youths’ Journey Starts Here

Photo by Merin McDonald / OUTLOOK Yahniie Bridges, Lucero Noyola, Patty Cabanillas, Gabby Hendriksen and Jesse Aguiar are all former foster youth who’ve found a new beginning at Journey House, a nonprofit that supports emancipated youth who have aged out of the foster care system.
Photo by Merin McDonald / OUTLOOK
Yahniie Bridges, Lucero Noyola, Patty Cabanillas, Gabby Hendriksen and Jesse Aguiar are all former foster youth who’ve found a new beginning at Journey House, a nonprofit that supports emancipated youth who have aged out of the foster care system.

For many foster youth, emancipation signifies freedom from years of displacement, confusion, confinement and often trauma. This freedom is short-lived, however, when emancipated foster youth face the reality that with it comes the loss of any structure or support, however scant, on which they previously relied. While some assistance is available after emancipation, after the age of 18, resources become few and far between as former foster youth “age out” of the system. By 24, emancipated fosters are more or less on their own, tossed out by a system that has taught them little about surviving, let alone succeeding, in the real world. Continue reading “After Foster Care, Youths’ Journey Starts Here”

A Hoop of Hope Brightens Lives at Homeless Facility

On a recent afternoon at Door of Hope’s transitional apartment complex, several children who have been left homeless as a result of domestic violence emerged from their living quarters and stepped outside into the fresh air. Many reside here with their mothers and usually don’t venture beyond the building’s walls for security reasons. On this day, though, a surprise awaited them in the facility’s side yard. Continue reading “A Hoop of Hope Brightens Lives at Homeless Facility”

Harambee’s New Gadget Sends Imaginations Into Orbit

Students at Harambee Preparatory School have spent much of the past couple of weeks staring into space. Their teachers aren’t concerned, however — it’s not the result of boredom, daydreaming or even post-lunch food coma, but rather the donation of a new device that allows them an astronaut’s view from the International Space Station. Continue reading “Harambee’s New Gadget Sends Imaginations Into Orbit”

Decoding Tech Opportunities for Local Students

It’s often said that the road to success starts in the classroom, but depending on what classroom you’re in, those roads aren’t often paved equally. This is certainly true for STEM/STEAM (science, technology, engineering, art and math) curricula, which has become a priority in education as students prepare for college and careers in the rapidly growing and increasingly competitive field of technology. But while some school programs flourish, others lack the funding and resources to keep up, passing a disparity of training and opportunities on to their students. Continue reading “Decoding Tech Opportunities for Local Students”

John Naber’s Olympian Task of Inspiring Others

John Naber was a junior in high school when he stepped onto the diving board and began bouncing up and down. The 16-year-old’s coach didn’t care too much for this brand of horseplay, not when the 1972 swim season was scheduled to begin the following day. Naber reluctantly prepared to end the fun by jumping into the water, but couldn’t leap forward because lane lines had already been strung across the pool, including one directly underneath him. So he aimed to the side, unaware that his antics were about to ensure that the wobbly board gave him an extra, unwanted boost. Continue reading “John Naber’s Olympian Task of Inspiring Others”

Staying Safe on Rainy Roads

With the force of El Niño storms already descending on the southland, drivers who’ve grown accustomed to the bone-dry climate of the California’s drought may find themselves in high water when they hit the road. While the wet weather will certainly slow down many Angelenos’ commutes, the dangers of driving in the rain far outweigh the inconvenience. Auto accident rates increase dramatically in rainy conditions because of wet roads, poor visibility and debris and standing water that present dangerous obstacles for drivers. Continue reading “Staying Safe on Rainy Roads”

50 Years of Peeking Inside the Gamble House

In a city rich with grand homes and architectural beauty, one structure bears the honor of being uniquely synonymous with Pasadena. It’s been more than a century since the Gamble House first came to stand on 4 Westmoreland Place, but it’s during the second half of that existence that the imposing Craftsman truly became a cultural icon of its home city. That’s all thanks to James N. Gamble (preferably called “Jim”), who, 50 years ago this week, bequeathed his family’s historical Greene & Greene home to the city of Pasadena and USC for public use. Since then, some 30,000 visitors have made their way to the Gamble House each year, completing the pilgrimage to a shrine of the American Arts and Crafts movement widely regarded as the Greene brothers’ most authentic and fully realized work. Continue reading “50 Years of Peeking Inside the Gamble House”