Pacific Asia Museum Gala on Saturday

Dr. Oi-Lin Chen and Dr. Tei-Fu Chen
Dr. Oi-Lin Chen and Dr. Tei-Fu Chen

The USC Pacific Asia Museum will host its annual gala on Saturday, June 10, at the Langham Huntington Hotel in honor of Legacy Award recipients Dr. Tei-Fu Chen and Dr. Oi-Lin Chen of the Chen Art Gallery and Visionary Artist Award recipient Tadashi Shoji, creative director of his eponymous fashion label.
The Legacy Award is for leadership and vision in the promotion of Asian art and culture through their collection, the Chen Art Gallery. Tei-Fu Chen serves on the USC PAM Board of Councilors and the Chen Art Gallery loaned significant and rare objects to the museum for its recent exhibition, “Royal Taste: The Art of Princely Courts in 15th Century China,” in 2016.
Fashion designer Tadashi Shoji, will receive the Visionary Artist Award, for his creative contribution in furthering Asian designs in fashion and the arts. Having built his brand in the early 1970s, Shoji has deep roots in Pasadena and also with the USC Pacific Asia Museum.

Tadashi Shoji
Tadashi Shoji

“I am proud to honor three leaders in the Asian community, two in art collecting and one in the fashion industry,” said USC PAM Director Christina Yu Yu. “Drs. Chen and Mr. Shoji are in line with USC PAM’s mission of furthering intercultural understanding through the arts and are primary examples of how to push that mission forward. This is our chance to say thank you to them for their support to the museum and contribution to Asian arts and culture throughout the region.”
Art lovers, donors, and collectors will gather to support USC PAM at a reception and silent auction, followed by dinner and a program. This year’s special guests include indie music artists Run River North and USC PAM Celebrity Ambassadors Hudson Yang, Ian Chen and Forrest Wheeler from ABC’s “Fresh Off the Boat” to assist with the paddle auction.
Individual tickets are $400-$2,500. Gala table prices range from $7,500-$50,000. For table and ticket information, follow this link: usc.edu/esvp (code: pamgala2017).

Father’s Day Reminds Us of an Important Bond

Dear Parents (especially dads),
Father’s Day is approaching in a couple of weeks, and hopefully the dads in your family will be properly pampered and honored for their very important role in family life.
The crucial bonding that takes place between a dad and his children during the simplest times they spend together, lays a solid foundation for lifelong learning and security.
The wording on a billboard once seen around town declared boldly, “Take Time to Be a Dad.” A tousle-headed little boy was pictured standing on his dad’s bare feet and holding onto dad, as he takes his son for a “sure-footed” ride.
This brought back pleasant memories for me as I remembered at a young age, waiting for my own dad to walk in the door at the end of the day and begging for this familiar transport, resulting in a giggly ride around the house, just Dad and me and our feet. So simple, so memorable.
Dads are busy. They’re the hunters and foragers. For many families, they provide the main financial stability for those they love.
They plot and plan, investigate and invest, search for the best deals, envision a future, grow a nest egg, transfer funds from here to there, worry about paying for camps and cars, colleges and years abroad, super-duper family vacations and eventually, destination weddings. Dads are busy providing. Admittedly, this takes time.
However, a dad’s work world is pretty much a mystery to most children. They have a vague idea of what type of work Dad does, but don’t have a clue as to the concerns that go into adequately providing for a family.
Unfortunately, children lack the ability to fully appreciate what a dad provides and will not have many memories of his days at work.
But children are sure about one thing. They always want to spend more time with their dad.
Observed recently: A local young father is taking his 2-year old son to day care. He is not in a hurry. He stops by a fence to let his son observe the nearby construction site with big noisy trucks and workmen with bright yellow hard hats. The little boy sits on his dad’s shoulders and they watch together. They do this several days a week. This dad gives a gift of time to his young son. So simple, but memorable.
Another dad takes his preteen daughter shopping for a birthday present for her mom. His chatty tweener talks nonstop. She is comparing, deciding, changing her mind, finding more ideas, frustrated at not finding the right thing. Dad lets her talk and talk, encourages her ideas, laughs at her indecision, admires her reasoning ability, patiently waits for the final purchase, then smiles. This dad gives his daughter a gift of time. So simple, but so fun to share a secret.
Another dad worked a long, four-day week and devoted Fridays to his family. On Friday mornings, before the children were old enough for school, the family went out to breakfast together. As the children grew, he took them for Saturday breakfasts. This was the intentional gift of time this dad (my husband) chose to give his family. Simple, memorable mornings.
Yet another dad took his son and daughter hiking in local mountains, taught them to swim in the bay, rode bikes with them, spent sunny Sunday afternoons looking for treasures in the seaside tide pools, took them miniature golfing, instructed them in archery, helped with science projects, taught them how to drive, and was patient with homework help. These are memories that I hold dear, as these were gifts of time my own dad gave to me and my brother.
The time my dad invested in me when I was a child created a lasting bond of love, which provided a solid foundation for life: He shared his sense of humor, he showed me how to face problems, how to enjoy the beauty of the great outdoors, how to be adventuresome and creative. During these times he shared with me, he passed on his life values and his faith.
Like all dads, my dad was busy as well, running his own business. He was a hunter and forager who provided well for his family. But in the midst of doing life, my dad made a conscious decision to “take time to be a dad.” His decision greatly affected my life.
My dad passed away a few years ago at age 101. Until the day he died, my dad was one of my best friends and a lifelong supporter. He gave me the most important thing a dad can give — himself. In doing so, he formed a lasting bond of love and security with his children.
There will always be work to do, it’s never-ending. But childhood is fleeting. Often times, children learn the most important lessons of life by simply spending time with their dads. It doesn’t matter very much what they’re actually doing together. What really matters most is that dad is giving his honest and pure self to his children — and that he’s taking time to be a dad during the fleeting days of childhood.

SM Rotary Sends Off Academy Appointees With Praise, Advice

Photo by Erin Rodick / OUTLOOK Lawrence Spicer (from left) Jordan Yriarte, Lenning Davis, Capt. Jinsuk Yum, Nicole Agbob and Charles Cathel were part of Rotary Club of San Marino’s Salute to Academy Appointees program. Yum spoke to recognize the perseverance of the high school graduates who were appointed to U.S. military academies.
Photo by Erin Rodick / OUTLOOK
Lawrence Spicer (from left) Jordan Yriarte, Lenning Davis, Capt. Jinsuk Yum, Nicole Agbob and Charles Cathel were part of Rotary Club of San Marino’s Salute to Academy Appointees program. Yum spoke to recognize the perseverance of the high school graduates who were appointed to U.S. military academies.

When Capt. Jinsuk Yum chose to enlist in the U.S. Army in 1999 as an 18-year-old fresh out of high school, he wasn’t sure where the decision would take him.
Nearly two decades later, the journey has included earning a bachelor’s degree in Mandarin Chinese from West Point, two overseas deployments and, currently, commanding the Los Angeles U.S. Army Recruiting Co.
“It’s been the best ride of my life so far,” he said last week, speaking at the annual Rotary Club of San Marino Salute to the Appointees to U.S. Service Academies program. Continue reading “SM Rotary Sends Off Academy Appointees With Praise, Advice”

Fusion Academy’s Flexible Summer Classes

Fusion Pasadena science teacher Marc Missirlian and student Kameline Keshavarzi finish an experiment in the science lab.
Fusion Pasadena science teacher Marc Missirlian and student Kameline Keshavarzi finish an experiment in the science lab.

For students who need to make up a class this summer but have other obligations, Fusion Academy Pasadena offers them the flexibility to do it all. WASC accredited and UC approved courses are taught one-to-one at our friendly and comfortable campus. Students will learn the material like never before.
For more information on Fusion Academy Pasadena, call (323) 258-2012 or go to fusionpasadena.com.

Polytechnic Football Scores Big With Hillsides

Photo courtesy Jennifer Godwin-Minto Poly Head of School John Bracker said football coach Chris Schmoke, pictured above talking to senior John Genske, is a good mentor to all of his athletes and students.
Photo courtesy Jennifer Godwin-Minto
Poly Head of School John Bracker said football coach Chris Schmoke, pictured above talking to senior John Genske, is a good mentor to all of his athletes and students.

Hillsides has partnerships with various schools in the Pasadena area, most notably Polytechnic. The union between the foster care organization and Poly began nearly 40 years ago and remains strong to this day.
Hillsides Tutor Coordinator Ian Lee praised Poly students for taking the time to tutor their clients, but working with an agency “dedicated to healing children and young adults, strengthening families and transforming communities through quality comprehensive services and advocacy,” he felt more could be done.
“I’m pretty sure I was the first one brave enough to ask, ‘Would you be open to hosting athletic clinics?’” Lee said. “We never really made a strong connection with an athletic student body group.”
Continue reading “Polytechnic Football Scores Big With Hillsides”