Public Safety Commission Debuts With Much to Discuss

Photo by Zane Hill / OUTLOOK Members of the newly sworn-in Public Safety Commission are Peter Loeffler (from left), alternate Jeff Boozell, Al Boegh, Hunter Chang, Eugene Ramirez and Gene Chuang. The commission meets on the third Monday each month.
Photo by Zane Hill / OUTLOOK
Members of the newly sworn-in Public Safety Commission are Peter Loeffler (from left), alternate Jeff Boozell, Al Boegh, Hunter Chang, Eugene Ramirez and Gene Chuang. The commission meets on the third Monday each month.

They are sworn in, have had their first meeting and already have amassed a collection of issues to discuss.
San Marino’s first Public Safety Commission, effectively a spin-off of the former Traffic Advisory Commission, held its inaugural meeting last Wednesday. It was led by the City Council, which swore in members and kick-started the discussion of what the commission will be handling.
“This is something that was part of my agenda, based upon the recommendations of many people in the community,” Mayor Steve Talt told the commission. “As you know, San Marino has suffered through — although on decline — an increase in residential burglaries and commercial burglaries in town and it’s best that we have as many minds on this as possible.
“We plan on keeping you busy for a while,” he added later.
Al Boegh, Hunter Chang, Gene Chuang, Peter Loeffler and Eugene Ramirez are the city’s five Public Safety commissioners, with Jeff Boozell serving as an alternate. Boegh was selected as chair this week, with Chang being chosen as vice chair.
In addition to handling issues related to analyzing crime statistics, promoting safety awareness and educating on fire safety, the commission also will absorb the Traffic Advisory Commission’s duties.
“I’ve been thinking of it as the Traffic Advisory Commission on steroids, with everything else we’re doing,” said Chang, who was a carryover appointment from the traffic commission.
Chuang, whose background is in technology, suggested working on a way to provide lists of certified surveillance and alarm devices and licensed installers for residents, particularly those who are not tech-savvy. He explained how he had extensively installed such equipment throughout his home.
“I think I’m probably a little on the forefront, but I think a lot of it can be applied to San Marino,” Chuang said.
Boegh highlighted a need for there to be some type of communication to residents about things each department is doing, especially successes they have.
“I think that the commission can play a big role in that, just in terms of how we communicate with the resources to the citizens, and maybe try to get over some misconceptions we have,” he said.
Boozell said he wanted to emphasize the importance of arming security systems, explaining that his home was burglarized while it was under construction but, despite that, he admitted to sometimes not activating his alarm.
He said he also wants to educate bicyclists and motorists on road-sharing etiquette.
Ramirez said he was concerned about helping the police and fire departments retain their leadership.
“I’m concerned about our retention of our top personnel in the police and fire departments,” he said. “A lot of other police departments and fire department have been poaching around, so I want to make sure we can hang onto our top talent.”
Chang said he had an eye for emergency preparedness.
“We have a lot of older homes and lots of older buildings,” he said. “Perhaps we can help a lot of the residents retrofit their homes.”
The Public Safety Commission will meet at 7 p.m. on the third Monday of each month.

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