Avramovich Makes Upward Jump in Young Life

Photo by Raymond Quan / OUTLOOK Dave Avramovich, the new Greater Los Angeles regional director for Young Life, has spent much of the last decade as the organization’s San Marino area director and also moonlighting as a football and baseball assistant coach at San Marino High School.
Photo by Raymond Quan / OUTLOOK
Dave Avramovich, the new Greater Los Angeles regional director for Young Life, has spent much of the last decade as the organization’s San Marino area director and also moonlighting as a football and baseball assistant coach at San Marino High School.

Dave Avramovich is looking for himself, to use a phrase.
More than a decade after taking on the duties of the San Marino Area director — which would later evolve into the Greater Pasadena area — for the nondenominational Christian-based nonprofit Young Life, Avramovich became the regional director for the Greater Los Angeles area on Tuesday, Aug. 1. Among his many responsibilities in his new job are finding his replacement.
“I’ll be looking for the next ‘me,’” he said in a telephone interview, “so that’s kind of a crazy deal.”
Despite taking on the greater role, Avramovich, who has and will continue to call Pasadena his home, said he plans on staying local.
Avramovich moved to Southern California in 2003 by way of Seattle, and was coaching in La Cañada Flintridge when Young Life’s director took note of his connection with his players. Avramovich also was studying at Fuller Theological Seminary in Pasadena at the time.
By January 2007, Avramovich took on his San Marino duties with Young Life, a youth group which aims to help kids grow through both faith- and community-based events and programs.
“The people are great, so it didn’t take long,” he said, when asked about acclimating to his then-new community. “Because I was coaching baseball and football right away, I got to quickly know a lot of parents.”
Which puts Young Life on the same page as those parents, explained Avramovich, himself a father. He points out research suggesting that kids and teenagers often only have minutes’ worth of meaningful interaction with adults each day, on average.
“Kids are desperate for relationships with adults,” he said. “They just don’t have them. If we can have a meaningful interaction, if we can listen for three or four minutes a day, we’re doubling that.
“They feel a lot of pressure to be great,” Avramovich added, speaking of San Marino’s children. “Kids are kids. They need their playtime. They need their unstructured time. I just hope when they’re with us, they don’t feel pressured and can just relax and have a good time.”
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