Erskine Offers Humor as Cure for Pandemic Perplexity

First published in the Nov. 26, 2020, print issue of the Outlook Valley Sun.

Chris Erskine

The man, the legend, the mustache.
For those who have followed local resident Chris Erskine and his nationally known humor columns over the years, it will come as no surprise that the author has released an endearing COVID-19 diary just in time for the next Safer at Home order, with handy “Quarantini” recipes at the ready: stiff on the gin, salty on the laughs.
Erskine, who just retired from the Los Angeles Times after 30 years, has engaged loyal readers for decades by sharing his personal tales of hilarity, sorrow, sweetness and everything in between, often combined together. His fourth book, “Lavender in Your Lemonade,” will not disappoint that audience, and arrives in the nick of time, when readers are just far enough into the pandemic they can laugh over the confounding disappearance of T.P. worldwide (“the Charmin virus,” he calls it), but so deep into the solitude of separation that people are desperate for an escape.
Because, as Erskine writes, nothing is off limits to being joked about:
“To laugh at this awful pandemic, the same way we mock despots and tyrants, is to make it a little less powerful, to rob it of its muscle and ability to push us around too much.
“Laughter is like porridge. Laughter is the best revenge.”
And then, as is vintage Erskine, a punch line, kind of — one of his delectable, idiosyncratic teasers: “My buddy Tom just told me a pretty good COVID-19 joke. I’d pass it along, but it takes two weeks to get.”
Sitting down with the Outlook Valley Sun via Zoom, Erskine explained his inspiration for the book, a collection of daily Facebook posts meant for devoted adherents, dear friends, friends you can laugh at and others, he wryly added.
Ahead of his retirement, his Times column running once every two weeks, Erskine found himself with time on his hands. And in the midst of a pandemic, what else is a writer to do? He took to Facebook, a newer medium for Erskine, who wasn’t always well versed in social media.
“I’m one of those old guys who’s awake at 5 or 5:30 a.m., and I would just tap out a Facebook post. I’d never done anything like this before, but it was in the early days of COVID and we’d never seen anything like it. Writing is kind of my therapy, and I had a lot to say,” he said. “I knew that I needed to laugh a little bit, and it turned into a little bit of a morning pep rally. We all needed to know that we were going to survive this, no matter what.”
The daily posts, which garnered hundreds of responses and comments (that “oftentimes, were so much funnier and bouncier than what I had originally posted,” Erskine said, in a likely overstatement), caught the attention of publisher Mike Sager of Esquire magazine.
When he reached out to ask about turning the odds and ends into a volume, the famously self-effacing Erskine responded, “A book? They are barely Facebook posts, Mike!”
After some convincing, Erskine was on board. Part of the endeavor felt like an ode to his Facebook group, which had gotten him through some dark days, and vice versa.
“I kind of think of it as a plate of warm cookies … you know, it’s not life changing or anything, it’s just kind of a nice gesture to my neighbors,” he said. “It’s kind of a compilation of all the things we took for granted, and you know, I don’t think we’ll ever take it for granted again. And in that way, we’ll be richer and remember that even in the darkest times, there are things that can make us smile and feel better.”
The rest, as he writes, is the “Lavender,” the giggle-inducing explanation of bizarre yet delicious items one might find at Trader Joe’s, a jest to chasing down eggs at Easter only to come up with an empty basket, the alarm at not being able to see people smile or the chagrin of trying to order at the deli counter through mask-muffled grunts and hand gestures.
It’s a trip worth taking, to laugh at the ludicrous, even as readers slide deeper into the pandemic.
“I think humor is really the great unifier — doesn’t humor bring us together?” mused Erskine, who is finally comfortable with social media in the time of COVID. “It gives us that communal back-and-forth that I think we all need in a time when we’re super isolated. You know, we’re pack creatures at the end of the day, we need each other.”
As always in his writings, La Cañada Flintridge plays in the background, like his silent movie partner. He never mentions the town by name (“Partly because of potential stalkers,” he said, only half joking), but the Chardonnay moms, the hiking pals, the local watering holes and his trusty steed, White Fang, all ring sweetly familiar.
Erskine considers moving, sometimes, especially since his youngest, Jack (aka “Smartacus”), will be off to college soon. But he’d miss La Cañada too much, he said.
“I mean, I would love to move sometimes, but then I’d have to take all my friends with me. And, you know, there’s a lot of places that wouldn’t take them.”

Les Tupper Awards Honor Volunteers

First published in the Sept. 30 print issue of the Outlook Valley Sun.

After a months-long delay due to the COVID-19 pandemic, the La Cañada Flintridge Coordinating Council held its 52nd annual Les Tupper Community Service Awards ceremony to honor individuals and organizations for their volunteer work.
The ceremony was held at Flintridge Preparatory School and the guest speaker for the evening was local resident Chris Erskine, a nationally known humor columnist and author.
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Erskine, Chamber Hosting Book Launch Fundraiser

Chris Erskine

The La Cañada Flintridge Chamber of Commerce will host a virtual book launch of LCF resident Chris Erskine’s new work, “Lavender in Your Lemonade.” The event, scheduled for 6:30 p.m. on Thursday, Oct. 1, is titled “Books, Booze, and Banter.”
“Chris Erskine has invited us to his living room — via Zoom — to celebrate the publication of his fourth book fresh out of the factory,” a Chamber spokesperson said. “It’s called a collection of his daily posts during the height of the COVID pandemic. Three takeaways: Where there is humor, there is hope. Where there is gin, there is tonic. And better times are always just ahead.”
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Terese Chiames Caire – Obituary

1962-2020

Terese Chiames Caire

Terese Chiames Caire passed into the arms of her loving God on April 29, 2020, after a courageous battle with COVID-19. She left us much too soon, but she left her family and friends with a lifetime of love and memories they will always cherish.
Terese was born in Fresno, CA, to Paul and Anita Chiames. Along with her brothers Chris and Paul, her extended family of grandparents, aunts, uncles, cousins were the centerpieces of her childhood.
Terese was active in school, church and social activities, whether as a cheerleader or student government officer at McLane High School, Sunday school teacher, Greek dance troupe member or a national officer for the Maids of Athena, a Greek-American service organization for young women. Her church and her Greek and Serbian/Montenegrin heritage were very important in her life. She participated in the first-ever Greek Folk Dance Festival and continued to be involved with her own children as the event grew to include over 3,500 dancers from across the U.S.
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LCF’s Erskine Has Book Signing April 24

Daditude

La Cañada Flintridge author and columnist Chris Erskine will take part in a reading and signing of his new book, “Daditude,” at 7 p.m. on Tuesday, April 24, at Vroman’s Bookstore in Pasadena.
The book is a collection of Erskine’s favorite columns, which mine the rich worlds of fatherhood, marriage and suburbia. His columns are featured weekly in the Los Angeles Times, Chicago Tribune and elsewhere nationwide. Erskine also is a staff editor and writer at the Los Angeles Times, as well as the author of two previous books, “Man of the House” and “Surviving Suburbia.”
For more information, visit prospectparkbooks.com or vromansbookstore.com.