GPD Reminds Pedestrians, Drivers of Safety Rules

September is Pedestrian Safety Month, and the Glendale Police Department is taking the opportunity to remind local residents of the importance of looking out for one another.
The COVID-19 pandemic is changing how Glendale residents get around, but the measures they can take to keep pedestrians safe are the same.
“We are all staying at home more, which means more of us are out walking for exercise or fresh air,” Sgt. Scott Byrne said in a news release. “Be alert, careful and mindful of those around you so we are all able to get home safely.”

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LAFCU Raising Funds for Children’s Hospital

In the spirit of “people helping people,” the Los Angeles Federal Credit Union is raising $1,500 for Children’s Hospital Los Angeles to support its COVID-19 Emergency Response Fund. For every dollar raised in the month of September, LAFCU will match up to $5,000 for CHLA through its charity arm, the Los Angeles Charitable Association. The hospital’s COVID-19 Emergency Relief Fund pays for:
• 5,000 daily COVID screenings for patients, families, guests and staff at CHLA
• 300 daily COVID tests for patients and staff at CHLA
• Telehealth resources and artificial intelligence COVID-screening bots
• Staffing to monitor patients with COVID
• Personal protective equipment and sanitation supplies for staff
One hundred percent of the donations raised will go toward direct COVID-19 medical services at CHLA.

For more information, visit lafcu.org/promotions.html.

‘Diversity, Antiracism’ Library Series Launches Sept. 24

Authors Eric Nusbaum and Gustavo Arellano will kick off a 10-monthlong series, “Be the Change: Inclusion, Diversity, Equity and Antiracism,” on Thursday evening, Sept. 24. In honor of Hispanic/Latinx Heritage Month, the pair will discuss Nusbaum’s new book, “Stealing Home: Los Angeles, the Dodgers, and the Lives Caught in Between,” during a public library forum at 6:30 p.m. Registration for the free virtual event is available at GLAC.info/BeTheChange.
“The series is being convened to help build a collective understanding of systemic racism, elevate the voices and stories of Black, Indigenous and People of Color, and inspire our community to be the change,” according to a press release.

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Memorial Tribute for Ronald S. Wu, M.D.

Dr. Ronald Wu

Dr. Ronald Wu, a physician blessed with extraordinary skills and a calm, quiet manner, is being remembered by friends, colleagues, patients and families whose lives he touched with great care and grace during his nearly 50 years in private practice, serving the Glendale community and beyond.
Dr. Wu passed away peacefully in his home during the early morning hours of September 8, surrounded by his family. During the past 16 years, he fought a heroic battle against lung cancer but remained steadfast in his commitment to his patients until he retired in June 2017.

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Terrill Robert Jennings

Terrill Robert Jennings passed away at his home in Tujunga, California on August 21st, 2020 surrounded by love. Terry was born on April 5th, 1944 to John Robert Jennings and Mary Kathryn Smith in St. Joseph, Missouri.
He was known by many different names over his life. Terry Bob to his parents, Twink (twinkle toes) to his high school friends, TJ to his adult friends, Papa and Daddy-O to his daughters and son-in-law, Grumpa to his 4 grandchildren and Terry-san to his late in life love.
He moved to Los Angeles in 1975 to pursue his drumming career and toured with the band Blues Image. After touring he worked at Wilder Brothers Studio in Beverly Hills as a recording engineer. He won an Emmy for his Muppet Baby sound track but may have been most proud of his work with the late radio personality Stan Freberg.
He is survived by wife Grace Chen, daughters Kym Mitchell and Kara Redmon, son-in-law and great friend Paul Mitchell, grandchildren Julian and Jenna Mitchell and Declan and Kieran Bryan and brother Chris Eaton. In lieu of flowers, donations can be made to the Silverlake Conservatory of Music.
A service will be held at Rose Hills Memorial Park for family members.

Doris ‘Dotty’ Greenawalt

Doris “Dotty” Anne Greenawalt, wife of David F. Greenawalt II (deceased), mother of Denise Anne Greenawalt (deceased) and David F. Greenawalt (surviving), passed on May 29, 2020. She graced this world for 85 years and brought joy and kindness with everyone she met. She was a woman of steadfast faith, kindness of heart, and laughter of tremendous joy. She was charitable, gracious, and loving. She led by example. Although her physical presence is no longer with us, her memories of love, life, family, faith, friends, animals, travel, and Bridge, Bridge, and more Bridge, will stay in our memories forever. She now rests with her husband and daughter at Forest Lawn Glendale, the Great Mausoleum, Sanctuary of Valor. We will miss her presence in our lives.

— The Family of Dotty

Family Seeks Answers From YMCA After Teen’s Drowning

Photo by Christian Leonard / News-Press
Mairena and Phil Jacobs (right) organized a protest Monday in connection with the death of their son, Colin, at a YMCA of the Foothills branch, saying the tragedy was preventable.

A Glendale family spearheaded a protest outside the offices of the YMCA of the Foothills this week to demand information about their son’s drowning death at the organization’s La Crescenta facility.
Colin Jacobs, a 19-year-old USC student, died on July 1 while on duty as a summer camp counselor at the YMCA branch in La Crescenta. A longtime volunteer for the organization, he was less than two weeks away from his 20th birthday.
Now, two months later, his family and friends say the YMCA of the Foothills has yet to explain the circumstances surrounding Jacobs’ drowning, or provide any promise to change its policies, saying that better practices might have avoided the tragedy.
On Monday, about 50 people gathered with signs in front of the organization’s La Cañada Flintridge location, which was chosen because it hosts the YCMA’s administrative offices, though it is not the site where Jacobs drowned.
“It could have very easily been prevented,” Phil Jacobs said of the death of his son, adding that Colin Jacobs could have suffered a seizure in the pool. “It was a very, very senseless death to somebody who was so focused on what he wanted to do and helping others. … He was an all-around great kid. He didn’t deserve this fate.”
The tragedy was referenced in a newsletter from YMCA of the Foothills CEO Vince Iuculano that was posted on the organization’s website on July 6. The statement included few details, saying that “out of respect for the family and the ongoing investigative process with the authorities, we can only share a limited update.”
But the Glendale family, which includes Colin’s mother, Mairena, and sister, Amber, said that it did not request that the YMCA withhold information — and that in fact family members have sought more details.
Phil Jacobs explained that the family contracted an attorney to speak with the YCMA’s attorney, hoping to arrange a meeting between the family and the nonprofit organization. But then, he said, the YMCA’s representative stopped responding to emails.

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Pirates’ Turley Shows Survivor’s Grit

Photo courtesy Pittsburgh Pirates
Pittsburgh Pirates reliever Nik Turley, who played in the Crescenta Valley Little League, has reestablished himself in the major leagues this summer. In one stretch, he made six appearances without giving up an earned run.

July’s opening day ceremonies and games marked not only the return of Major League Baseball and a semblance of normalcy in a world of COVID-19, but the beginning of Nik Turley’s comeback tour.
“That was my first opening day,” said Turley, a journeyman pitcher who earned a spot on the Pittsburgh Pirates’ season-opening roster, a first in the Crescenta Valley Little League product’s career. “With no fans, it was a different experience for an opening day, but it was pretty special for me.”
It was especially momentous for Turley, 30, because he had not pitched in the major leagues since 2017 due to a suspension and Tommy John surgery. The Pirates claimed him off waivers from the Minnesota Twins, with whom he made his MLB debut, two years ago and made a place for the left-hander on their 30-man roster.

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School Board Begins Discussion of Year’s Priorities

Photo courtesy GUSD
Roosevelt 8th-grade student Izel Aguayo (left) receives her Chromebook from office clerk Andrea Trana and science teacher John Carroll.

Following what can probably be categorized as the most volatile six months in its history, the Glendale Unified School District Board of Education discussed its list of priorities for the 2020-21 school year at its meeting Tuesday evening.
And, not surprisingly, making sure that distance learning works for all GUSD students amid the COVID-19 pandemic dominated the discourse.
Following tradition, the board first analyzed the set of guidelines that were adopted a year ago and include maximizing student achievement, creating a culture of learning, increasing engagement and maintaining district solvency and financial responsibility. Then Superintendent Vivian Ekchian pushed the discussion — which will continue in future meetings — toward major focus areas for the current academic year.
“This is the time to speak up,” Ekchian quipped, introducing the free-form conversation that followed.

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City Sees Appeal in Possible Sustainability Commission

Glendale is a step closer to forming a sustainability commission, with municipal staff members working on an ordinance to craft the panel at the direction of the City Council, which voted Tuesday on the matter.
Though the potential commission’s goals aren’t yet set, David Jones, who was recently hired as Glendale’s first sustainability officer, suggested that it serve as an advisory board to the council on a variety of environmental subjects.
Jones told council members that the commission could advise on topics including transportation, biodiversity, responses to climate change, air quality and environmental justice. Similar commissions in nearby cities, including Burbank and Pasadena, commonly help guide their city councils on these subjects, he explained, and also tend to handle community education.

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