New Leaders Chosen for Airport Authority Commission

The Burbank-Glendale-Pasadena Airport Authority, owner and operator of Hollywood Burbank Airport, has elected new officers to head the Authority Commission through June 2021.
Pasadena Commissioner Ross Selvidge was elected president, Commissioner Paula Devine of Glendale was anointed as vice president, and Burbank Commissioner Don Brown was chosen secretary. The commission elects its officers each July.
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PCF Fund Helps Armory Center for the Arts

Online drawing class with local teens, produced in collaboration with Day One and the library.

“Art has a way of keeping our souls full,” said Leslie Ito, executive director of the Armory Center for the Arts, one of the five art organizations that recently received a Rowe & Gayle Giesen Trust grant, a Pasadena Community Foundation fund that supports visual arts experiences for children and youth.
During a typical summer, the Armory coordinates with local partners to offer free community art programs complete with free art supplies. This summer, despite the challenges of COVID-19 restrictions, the Armory has teamed with select partners –the Pasadena Public Library, Adelante Youth Alliance, Stars Tutoring Group and more – to continue inspiring young people in the world of art.
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For Those Who Can’t Shop, These Youths Deliver

Photos courtesy Shannon Petersen
Ryan Purdy, an LCF resident and senior at St. Francis, was inspired by neighboring youth leaders and helped start the Six Feet Supplies
La Cañada branch.

As coronavirus cases increased throughout the nation in March, officials took widespread action to close schools, and students here and elsewhere missed out on important, enjoyable life events.
Carly Petersen was ready to go to snowshoeing in Idaho with her classmates, but Westridge School in Pasadena canceled the trip due to the pandemic.
“At the time, I was mostly just upset because I was supposed to go on a school trip,” said Petersen, a La Cañada Flintridge resident who will be a junior at La Cañada High School after transferring from Westridge. “I was so focused on what I was missing out on instead of what was to come.”
Her friend Ryan Purdy also went through a rough period as a member of the St. Francis High School varsity boys’ basketball team. The Golden Knights punched their ticket to Sacramento to play in the CIF State Division II championship but never got the opportunity to compete. The biggest game in the history of the program was canceled by the state’s governing board for high school athletics.
“We were all packed up and ready to leave at lunchtime,” he said. “CIF made the announcement at 9:30 a.m. We were shocked, and it was a very sad thing for us.”
Continue reading “For Those Who Can’t Shop, These Youths Deliver”

U.S. Security Adviser O’Brien Tests Positive for COVID-19

Photo courtesy U.S. State Department
National Security Adviser Robert O’Brien, a former LCF resident, has tested positive for COVID-19 but is experiencing only mild symptoms, according to President Trump’s administration.

Former La Cañada Flintridge resident Robert C. O’Brien, who is serving as President Donald Trump’s national security adviser, has tested positive for COVID-19, the White House confirmed in a statement this week.
O’Brien appears to be doing well, however, as the White House stated: “He has mild symptoms and has been self-isolating and working from a secure location off site.”
O’Brien joins the 4.34 million Americans who’ve been confirmed as having the disease, which has killed more than 148,866.
The statement emphasized that there has been “no risk of exposure to the president or vice president. The work of the National Security Council continues uninterrupted.”
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Local Attorney Publishes First Book at 88

By Judge Gregory O’Brien

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Although new author Tom Gilfoy has lived much of his life in La Cañada Flintridge, his first book is about his early life in nearby Sunland. Titled “Growing Up in Sunland and Other Short Stories,” the hardcover book includes many historical pictures of the area, stories about Lake View Terrace and memoirs of Gilfoy’s early years working in the woods and logging camps of Northern California.
When asked why he waited so long to publish his first book, Gilfoy said it was out of deference to his friends and relatives. “This way they don’t have to worry about me living long enough to write another book and making them read it, too,” he explained.
The Little Landers Historical Society in Tujunga has been given exclusive rights to sell this first edition of the book, and it is to them that all income from sales is being donated.
Advance praise of the book includes this review by the Hon. Gregory O’Brien, Los Angeles Superior Court Judge (ret.) and former president of the California Judges Association:
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PUSD to Start School Year With Distance Learning

By Brian McDonald
Special to The Outlook

Brian McDonald

On July 16, the Pasadena Unified School District Board of Education authorized the start of the new school year. PUSD will begin the new school year on Aug. 17 in a distance learning environment.
On July 17, Gov. Gavin Newsom laid out new statewide mandates for schools that affirm the decisions and direction that PUSD is taking to keep our students and staff healthy and safe. PUSD will adhere to state and county mandates. The state mandate addresses safe in-person school based on local health data, requirements of masks/face covering, physical distancing, testing, rigorous distance learning, and the criteria for schools to close when a member of our school community tests positive for COVID-19.

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Obituary | Hortense Banwer

One year ago on June 28, 2019, Hortense Banwer, 94, of Palm Springs, California, died peacefully in Palm Desert, California. She was born to Francisco and Josefa Ramirez in Parral, Mexico, October 28, 1924. After the death of her parents she moved to the United States with her sisters Alicia, Dora, and Luz. She was married to Daniel (David) Banwer for over thirty years until his death in 1984. Together they raised eight children in Los Angeles and South Pasadena. She is survived by all eight children: Luis, Dana (Brian Hurd), Hortense Packer “Fo” (James), Sonia “Sunny” (Rob Rosenthal), Abner (Brooke), Michael, Melisse “Mitzi” and Jeffrey. She also leaves twelve grandchildren and fourteen great-grandchildren.
Loving and loyal to her family, she was a spirited people person and every stranger was a new friend. We love you, we miss you, and we raise a glass (white wine, of course) to you, Mom.
Hortense was interred at Desert Memorial Park in Cathedral City, California, in a private ceremony, and a celebration of her life was held several months later in October of 2019, when she would have celebrated her 95th birthday.

Panel Gathering BPD-Related Topics for Discussion

The city’s Police Commission is gearing up for a series of monthly discussions about the Burbank Police Department’s policies, though some commissioners also emphasized caution in responding to residents’ calls for reform.
The commission largely used Tuesday’s meeting to develop ideas for discussion at future meetings. Many of the topics were brought up by residents who called in during the public comment period.

Chief Scott LaChasse appeared at a Burbank Police Commission meeting on Tuesday, when the panel considered topics regarding the BPD that it could discuss throughout the year. Ideas included reviewing the Police Department’s use-of-force practices and disciplinary procedures.

For instance, some residents who called the commission asked the group to review the way the BPD responds to situations involving a person with a mental illness, suggesting that sending mental health professionals would be a more appropriate response then sending an armed officer.
Some also wanted the BPD, which publishes its use-of-force policy and annual complaints statistics on its website, to list a breakdown of arrest records by race. Others pushed for funding to be diverted from the department to other city agencies.
“I have only ever had positive experiences with BPD and I am grateful for the work you do,” said Katie Ward in a public comment made to commissioners by phone. “I also understand, however, that I am afforded privilege by virtue of my white skin that not everyone is afforded, so I am mindful that my experience isn’t the only one to consider as a member of this community.”
The Police Commission, which advises the City Council, cannot make policy decisions on its own — a fact commissioners emphasized during their Tuesday meeting. Continue reading “Panel Gathering BPD-Related Topics for Discussion”

Activist’s Effort Was Solitary, but Now There’s Solidarity

The one-man demonstration by local resident Spencer Carney, shown in the foreground, inspired others to join him in front of City Hall on Tuesday to show support for Black Lives Matter and Pride Month. The group plans to return on each remaining Tuesday this month.
Photo by Zane Hill / Glendale News-Press

As he took note of the massive protests forming in the Los Angeles area, Spencer Carney knew he had a decision to make.
The protests joined countless others throughout the nation and world, all to call out systemic racism and policy brutality after George Floyd was arrested in Minneapolis and died after one of the four arresting officers knelt on his back and neck for nearly nine minutes. But, Carney noted, they also ran contrary to social distancing widely adopted to help curb COVID-19, a disease of particular threat to senior citizens such as those who occupy most of the Glendale resident’s apartment building.
“The idea of going out to a protest and exposing myself to people not practicing social distancing or wearing a mask represented a conflict,” he said. “It was difficult for me to brainstorm these things, because in the past, I was always that guy who would go out and protest. I’ve been to the last two Women’s Marches. I went to USC and helped start One for All, which is a social justice theater troupe.”
Having attended various Pride events in years past, Carney also took note of the All Black Lives Matter march in Hollywood last weekend, which called attention to the adversity faced by black members of the LGBTQIA community and took place in lieu of the canceled Pride Parade. Continue reading “Activist’s Effort Was Solitary, but Now There’s Solidarity”

GUSD Passes Budget With $20 Million Deficit

The Glendale Unified School District Board of Education on Tuesday adopted its budget for the 2020-21 school year “begrudgingly,” in the words of board member Greg Krikorian, who nevertheless had no other options given the state’s bleak financial situation.
The general fund portion of the budget is used to educate the district’s 26,000 students and includes a little over $289 million in revenues and more than $309 million in expenditures. The $20.3 million deficit is caused by the 10% cut to public education funding in Gov. Gavin Newsom’s recent May Revise budget proposal due to the COVID-19 health and financial crisis. The GUSD had until June 30 to submit a budget to the Los Angeles County Office of Education, or LACOE, a tenet that was satisfied by the unanimous vote.
As bad as it may appear, things could have been even direr.
Worst-case scenarios explained by Steve Dickinson, the district’s chief business and financial officer, projected deficits as high as $53 million for the upcoming school year. This week, however, the state legislature passed a budget bill that does not include any reductions to public education funding, but instead relies heavily on assumptions of California receiving billions of dollars in federal relief funds. Until the final state budget act is approved, GUSD and all school districts in the state will be planning for large budget reductions in the coming years. Continue reading “GUSD Passes Budget With $20 Million Deficit”