FSHA Breaks Barriers With Streamed Virtual Fall Play

Cast members (in alphabetical order) include Ava Baluyut Barraza, Maria Boutros, Ziling “Coco” Chen, Kayla Copping, Simone Crowder, Audrey de Groot, Ava DeFranco, Renee Deramerian, Brenna Derbish, Isabella Durand, Lauren Gmelich, Natalia Gonzalez, Corinne Gray, Sara Green, Sara Gutierrez, Abbie Hardy, Charlie Hardy, Jordyn Hart, Caitlin Hubbs, Cassie Huston, Maddie Jerman, Ava King, Ava Kitt, Carissa Klaus, Becket Knight, Jalen Lee, Macey Lillard, Farrah Mackenzie, Samantha Milat, Anya Millard, Emily Meadow Mota, Caitlin Norton, Olivia Ocon, Kana Park, Angelina Reddy, Samantha Savage, Sofia Sierra, Jin Yi “Linda” Sun, Claire Thomas, Graciela Tiu, Katie Wilson and Sophia Wilson.

Although every industry has been affected by this pandemic, one thing will always ring true: the human need to connect through art. Though in-person performances are not possible, creative minds have come together to find opportunities to tell stories that bring us purpose and hope, regardless of the circumstances.
Flintridge Sacred Heart’s theater teacher Jane McEneaney has done just that with a four-part show “The Girl Who Was a Hundred Girls” by Finegan Kruckemeyer. Through the use of streaming technology and green screens, McEneaney brought students from all over the world, some who have never met in person, together on screen. Seamlessly choreographed, there were moments where it was hard to believe that the actresses were not in the same location.
In choosing the right production for her students, McEneaney thought that the story of bravery encircled in hope links 16-year-old girls as they face impossible odds and refuse to accept defeat. “I knew it was the right script because each time I read it, I was awash in tears and motivated to make theater happen. I knew it was the right script because of its message of resilience and hope. That is what I want my girls to hear and to emulate.”

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This production breaks barriers through computer screens the way Flintridge Sacred Heart performers break through to touch the hearts and minds of their audience. Sister Carolyn McCormack sees this production as a “symbol that shows us all what is possible for us to do when we have a creative spirit. We are in a moment of incredible opportunity for change and this is the time for us to reflect on the traditions that are so beloved, to see which are set in stone and which are open to new possibilities and growth.”
In what may be the darkest moment in many of our lives, stories help us to endure the unfathomable and find hope within.

 

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