Leader Suggests Rotary Offer Both Fiscal, Physical Support

Greg Johansing
Greg Johansing

As Rotary Club of San Marino’s president for the next year, Greg Johansing said he hoped to find ways for the club to raise funds and contribute to causes without dipping too heavily into its coffers.
Such projects or fundraisers, he said, would help the club in some of its present functions. As an example, the club doled out about $17,000 in mini-grants for local teachers this year, though requests totaled around $45,000.
“I think we could close that gap if we do a couple of these projects,” Johansing said.
In terms of local projects, Johansing said simple endeavors like school cleanups throughout the community were what he had in mind. He specifically mentioned one at a Pasadena-area school in the past year.
“I doubt that cost much money to do, just some people putting in a little sweat, and it turned out beautiful,” he said.
Johansing takes over leadership of the club after Fang Ho presided over it for a year. Aaron Gil will follow next July 1.
Meanwhile, Aaron Weiss presented a donation of $95,000 to the club last week, a portion of the proceeds from the ninth annual San Marino Motor Classic, held in June. The club is linked with the event, usually taking on a promotional role and asking its members to work at the event as volunteers.
In return, Weiss makes the club one of three recipients of charity donations — Cancer Support Community and Pasadena Humane Society also receive donations — using the club as a conduit to fund local construction projects.
“I am personally a brick-and-mortar donor,” Weiss said. “I’m a sucker for a building.”

Rotary Club of San Marino President Greg Johansing (left) and Charity Committee chair Mike Driebe flank San Marino Motor Classic founder Aaron Weiss (center)
Photo by Zane Hill / OUTLOOK
Rotary Club of San Marino President Greg Johansing (left) and Charity Committee chair Mike Driebe flank San Marino Motor Classic founder Aaron Weiss (center), who presented the club with a $95,000 donation last week. For years, Weiss has donated a portion of the Motor Classic’s proceeds to the club, which contributes a network of volunteers for the event.

Last year, the Motor Classic’s donation was used to help the city fund a new restroom facility at Lacy Park, where Weiss’ event takes place, and for the previous year the money was donated to the Barth Athletics Complex being built by the school district.
This year, Weiss suggested targeting the athletics complex again or perhaps the reconstruction of the popular rose arbor at Lacy Park’s west entrance.
“I thought [the restroom donation] was appropriate because we use the park and we should give back to the park,” Weiss said. “We should take our money and reinvest it in the community. That’s better in my opinion, for what that’s worth. I think we should see where that money’s going and that we should [all] benefit from it.”

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