PCC Foundation Ready to Assist Students During Crisis

By Bill Hawkins, President, PCC Foundation

The Pasadena City College Foundation’s highest priority is ensuring that students’ needs are met so that they can persist toward their academic goals. The Pasadena City College campus is closed to students and the public until April 20. Classes, counseling and other student services will be offered online. Full-time employees, hourly workers and personnel determined by the campus leadership will continue day-to-day operations whether on-campus or remotely.
Students’ lives are changing daily. Depending on their individual circumstances, some students have had work hours from their part-time jobs essentially eliminated; others are having to scramble for child-care support while others are left to care for their elderly relatives. All of these situations threaten their academic progress by putting increased pressure on their households.
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Poly, Flintridge Prep, Maranatha, La Salle Athletes Earn All-CIF

Photo by Oscar Areliz / OUTLOOK
Stanford-bound Talie Wilmans made the All-CIF Division 4 first team after helping the Panthers reach the quarterfinals.

The CIF Southern Section released its All-CIF soccer and girls’ water polo lists last week and they included athletes from Polytechnic, Flintridge Prep, Maranatha High School and La Salle College Preparatory.
Two members of the Poly boys’ soccer team were recognized after a memorable season. Aaron Tyler and Josh Calichman helped the Panthers (13-4-3 overall record) reach the Division 6 semifinals and made the All-CIF team. Poly recorded playoff victories over Temple City, Santa Monica Crossroads and Palmdale Aerospace Academy.
Girls’ water polo standout Talie Wilmans of Poly also earned All-CIF honors in Division 4. The Stanford-bound senior led the Panthers to a CIF-SS quarterfinals appearance.
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Pasadena Humane Society Aids Pets During Crisis

Photo courtesy Pasadena Humane Society
A Pasadena Humane Society volunteer recently distributes food as part of its Helping Paws program, a pet food bank offering free food and supplies to animal owners in need. The nonprofit expects more people to struggle with feeding and keeping their pets amid the coronavirus fallout.

With the effects of the coronavirus trickling into every crevice of modern-day sustainability, the Pasadena Humane Society & SPCA is gearing up to help those it knows are most impacted in times of crisis: unemployed people and their pets.
Even those people who had been doing relatively well economically are expected to struggle financially because of the closures that were enacted to stem the spread of COVID-19, especially if they are part of the retail, restaurant, hotel or service industries. In times of hardship, people often need to abandon their rented homes and apartments with their beloved animals.
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Caution Urged as Three Coronavirus Cases Emerge

Photo by Wes Woods II / OUTLOOK
The tennis courts on Cornishon Avenue were closed recently after the city of La Cañada Flintridge took action to reduce opportunities for coronavirus transmission following an L.A. County Department of Public Health order.

As Los Angeles County Department of Public Health officials confirmed three coronavirus cases in a region including La Cañada Flintridge as of Wednesday, the city’s mayor called this a “serious and difficult time” for the community.
The region referred to by public health also includes unincorporated La Crescenta-Montrose and has a population of 40,253.
“I ask that our residents stay up to date with the recommendations to battle this virus,” Mayor Leonard Pieroni said in an email to The Outlook this week. “Adhere to the ‘safer at home’ orders from the federal, state and county leadership. We are all in this situation together. I count on our community to look out for our families, friends, and especially those that might need more help during this time. We will get through this, and I am looking forward to that.”
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L.A. County Announces Three New Deaths Related to Coronavirus

The Los Angeles County Department of Public Health has confirmed three new deaths and 138 new cases of 2019 novel coronavirus (COVID-19). All three individuals that died were over the age of 65 and had underlying health conditions.
One individual resided in Gardena, one in Wilmington and the other case is still under investigation. Additional information regarding some of the new cases is pending further investigation. Over the last 48 hours there have been 266 new cases.
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LCUSD Superintendent’s Message on Status of District

By Wendy Sinnette, Special to The Outlook

Wendy Sinnette

I hope everyone is managing during these unprecedented times as we engage with Gov. Newsom’s “Safer at Home” order and work together to flatten the curve of infection with the COVID-19 virus. I am grateful to The Outlook and Charlie Plowman for giving me the opportunity to update the larger community regarding the status of our schools in the La Cañada Unifed School District.
I have been regularly emailing district families, students in grades 7-12 and staff, but given the support that the community of La Cañada Flintridge continually demonstrates for its schools, it is important to keep everyone informed regarding district updates. Our schools closed on Friday, March 13, in response to the coronavirus pandemic. Teachers were provided two days to prepare for distance learning, which officially commenced on Tuesday, March 17. Our teachers and students have access to Google Classroom, and student textbooks and learning apps are stored in Classlink, an online centralized platform. Other resources available for distance learning opportunities are Screencastify, Google Hangouts, Zoom, YouTube and EdPuzzle. Teachers are designing lessons according to their instructional style and working hard to ensure a continuation of learning throughout the school closure period.
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Judges, Courtroom Staff, Attorneys Must Quarantine for 14 Days

Presiding Judge Kevin C. Brazile recently announced that a judge assigned to a Dependency department in the Edmund D. Edelman Children’s Courthouse in Monterey Park notified the court Tuesday of being diagnosed with symptoms consistent with COVID-19. Although the judge has not been tested, in an abundance of caution, the court has asked the affected judge and court staff to self-quarantine. Due to privacy issues, names will not be released.
The court also has notified the agencies and attorney offices assigned to handle the cases in the affected department, including the Los Angeles County Department of Children and Family Services; Los Angeles Dependency Lawyers; Children’s Law Center; Office of the Los Angeles County Counsel; and the Sheriff’s Department.
After receiving notification from the judge, the court cleaned and disinfected the courtroom and the judge’s chambers according to guidelines from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The courthouse, which handles adoptions and juvenile dependency, will remain open. The court will make every effort to advise all people who may have been exposed to the affected judge.
For the latest updates on coronavirus-related impacts to court operations, consult the court’s COVID-19 News Center located at the top of its homepage at lacourt.org.

Take Steps to Protect Your Mental Health in Stressful Times

By Annette Ermshar, Special to The Outlook

Annette Ermshar

The coronavirus has triggered surprising behavioral responses, including panic buying and convincing yourself that a throat tickle might mean a fatal illness. But equally concerning is the increase in mental health symptoms.
Self-isolation, loss of freedom, uncertainty and fear about what is ahead, and a change in routine and schedule are all contributing to increased stress, anxiety and feelings of helplessness.
Uncertainties can instill a deep sense of fear. They include such questions as:
What protective steps can I take?
How extreme should we be in our response?
Are increased hand-washing and avoiding crowds sufficient, or should we self-quarantine?
Should we move forward with our planned vacation?
Should I close down my office or business?
Should I cancel my spring wedding?
It is this uncertainty that drives anxiety, because people fear the unknown. When we don’t know what steps to take or we have a substantial shift in our routine, we feel vulnerable because we all like to plan ahead. Yet we are faced with significant and unpredictable disruptions to our routine and way of life. Uncertainty exceeds the medical issues at hand, and these disruptions have broader implications.
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COVID-19: Don’t Forget the Basics of Prevention

By Mary Virgallito, Special to The Outlook

Mary Virgallito

During a time of heightened anxiety and uncertainty, I’d like to take this opportunity to review what is currently known about COVID-19 and provide a refresher on the basics about preventing the spread of respiratory diseases. There is currently no vaccine to prevent COVID-19 and so the best way to prevent illness is to avoid being exposed.
How it is spread: COVID-19 is thought to spread mainly from person-to-person through respiratory droplets produced when an infected person coughs or sneezes. These droplets can land in the mouths or noses or inhaled into the lungs of people within close contact (about 6 feet) of an infected person who has produced these droplets. Surface-to-person transmission of COVID-19 has not yet been documented but current evidence suggests that the virus can remain viable for hours to days on a variety of surfaces. Therefore, it is recommended to clean and disinfect frequently touched surfaces daily, including tables, doorknobs, light switches, countertops, handles, desks, phones, keyboards, toilets, faucets and sinks. Most common EPA-registered household disinfectants will work for this purpose.
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Red Cross Urgently Seeks More Blood Donations

Amid reports that hundreds of blood drives have been canceled recently as fears about coronavirus risks have increased, the American Red Cross has restated its commitment to the safety of donors, patients, volunteers and staff members.
A Red Cross leader made a plea for blood donations and spoke about safety measures the organization has taken.
“We recognize that this health crisis may create some questions about donating blood at this time,” said American Red Cross Biomedical Services President Chris Hrouda.
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