Glendale Hospitals Being Stressed by Raging Coronavirus Surge

Hospital officials in Glendale are urging residents to commit to behavior that will significantly reduce their potential exposure to the coronavirus, as the explosive surge in COVID-19 cases that began in late November continues to push medical facilities to the brink.
Southern California has been at 0% availability for intensive care unit beds since late December, according to county Department of Public Health officials. The raging surge in daily new coronavirus cases continues to set records nearly every day as medical centers scramble to add personnel as they’ve reportedly turned away ambulances and others seeking emergency care.

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Dignity Health-Glendale Memorial Hospital Leader Confident Amid Virus’ Surge

 

By Jill Welton
President, Dignity Health-Glendale Memorial Hospital

Jill Welton

These are truly unprecedented times. Our nurses, physicians and other health-care workers train and drill for epidemic and pandemic responses throughout their careers. Yet we have never seen anything like COVID-19. Regardless of how relentless this virus has been, our staff suits up and shows up every day to continue to provide high-quality, compassionate care to those in need.
Everyone is experiencing some level of “pandemic fatigue.” Those of us in health care have a special responsibility and a unique opportunity to lead in this time of uncertainty. We will stay true to our values and strive to do the right thing for our staff, physicians, patients and community to get through this crisis — together.
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USC Verdugo Hills Hospital Leader Confident Amid Virus’ Surge

By Keith Hobbs
CEO, USC Verdugo Hills Hospital

Keith Hobbs

We are most definitely seeing a spike in COVID-19 cases locally, regionally and nationally — the news is real. We all heard the public health warnings before Thanksgiving; the combination of colder weather, families wanting to gather for the holidays and students returning home from college would likely result in increased exposure and transmission.
At USC Verdugo Hills Hospital we are already seeing an increase in COVID-19 cases in our Emergency Room and among our admitted patient population, and these are not even people who were exposed due to Thanksgiving gatherings. The incubation period of the virus means that surge is still likely a week away.

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Adventist Health Glendale Leader Confident Amid Virus’ Surge

 

By Alice Issai
President, Adventist Health Glendale

Alice Issai

This year has brought so many challenges — to our organization, our community and each of us individually. Now, as we embark on a holiday season during a global pandemic, my thoughts immediately turn to our front-line workers and the many community members for whom comfort and joy will be difficult to find.
As with other medical centers, Adventist Health Glendale is seeing a steady climb in the number of patients with COVID-19. State and county officials, fearful of mass spreading, have curtailed activities, instituted curfews and pleaded with the public to heed public health experts’ calls to wear your mask, watch your distance and wash your hands — still the best line of defense against contracting the coronavirus.
And yet, true to the season’s essence, there is hope.
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Local Restaurants Struggle With Dining Ban

Photo by Christian Leonard / Burbank Leader
Michel LeChasseur, who owns Ma’s Italian Kitchen in Burbank, said he feels restaurants are being unfairly singled out by Los Angeles County officials for a rise in COVID-19 cases.

Michel LeChasseur, owner of Ma’s Italian Kitchen in Burbank, said his business is on its last legs. He also said his restaurant is one of the lucky ones.
LeChasseur said the eatery, which made much of its revenue from its catering services to production studios, is bringing in less than a third of what it did before the COVID-19 pandemic. He had to slash employees’ hours and lay off 14 of his 22 workers. He added that he even chose to forgo his own salary so he could keep paying his workers; his husband’s job is keeping them both afloat.
Still, LeChasseur learned to adjust, though he watched eight friends lose their restaurants during the pandemic. He spread out tables on his restaurant’s patio and bought Plexiglas shields to protect customers. His servers wore gloves and two layers of masks. As the colder months approached, he purchased heaters.

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Hospital Leaders Confident Amid Virus’ Surge

By Keith Hobbs
CEO, USC Verdugo Hills Hospital

Keith Hobbs

We are most definitely seeing a spike in COVID-19 cases locally, regionally and nationally — the news is real. We all heard the public health warnings before Thanksgiving; the combination of colder weather, families wanting to gather for the holidays and students returning home from college would likely result in increased exposure and transmission.
At USC Verdugo Hills Hospital we are already seeing an increase in COVID-19 cases in our Emergency Room and among our admitted patient population, and these are not even people who were exposed due to Thanksgiving gatherings. The incubation period of the virus means that surge is still likely a week away.

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Older Adulthood Should Be Embraced, Celebrated

By Sandy Greenstein
Special to The Outlook

Photo courtesy Pasadena Senior Center
Sandy Greenstein, president of the Pasadena Senior Center board, is pictured with the organization’s executive director, Akila Gibbs.

Myths, assumptions and stereotypes about older adults abound, even two decades into the 21st century: Most are disconnected from the mainstream, stuck in the past, a crotchety and feeble bunch, no longer bring value to the workplace … and the list goes on. The fact is that older Americans today in their 60s, 70s, 80s and beyond are leading longer, healthier lives than their parents and grandparents ever could have hoped for.
Even the terminology has changed: Terms such as “elderly” and “senior citizens” now bear the stigma of dependence and being pushed aside. These terms have been largely replaced by “older adults,” which translates to independence, experience and wisdom. Language matters.
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