City Wants Local Polling Place for Nov. 3 Election

Photo by Keira Wight / Outlook Valley Sun
A drop-off box for mail-in ballots has been placed outside the La Cañada Flintridge Library, but city officials also are asking the county to place a voting center in the city. The nearest locations for in-person voting for the Nov. 3 election are in La Crescenta and Altadena.

 

In an effort to provide La Cañada Flintridge residents with more voting locations for the Nov. 3 election, City Manager Mark Alexander assured the community on Tuesday that municipal staff members are working with the Los Angeles County registrar-recorder office to possibly open a voting center here.
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Learning New Tricks: Kids Train Shelter Dogs During Pandemic

Photo courtesy Boys & Girls Club of Pasadena
A Boys & Girls Club of Pasadena member displays his dog-training skills at an obstacle course with a shelter dog named Dodger at a previous K9 Youth Alliance program. Since the pandemic began, the nonprofit K9YA has created a virtual dog-training program for 6th-graders at the club that is seen as a great success.

As it turns out, teaching old dogs new tricks is possible: A beloved program for local youth at the Boys & Girls Club of Pasadena recently found a way to break through the COVID-19 pandemic’s barriers to virtually teach kids to help shelter dogs and foster their love for animals.
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LCUSD Targets Date for Hybrid Schedule

The months-long discourse over a hybrid schedule for La Cañada High School and LCHS 7/8 students came to an end as the local school system’s governing board unanimously came to an agreement during a virtual meeting on Tuesday.
Beginning Jan. 5, 2021, the La Cañada Unified School District will implement a schedule that would allow 50% of students in grades 7-12 to receive on-campus instruction two days a week. LCUSD would have to adhere to Los Angeles County’s reopening protocols for schools and reach an accord with labor unions.
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USC-VHH Holds Suicide Prevention Conference

State Sen. Anthony Portantino

The numerous unexpected challenges, uncertainty and tension brought about by the COVID-19 pandemic, social unrest and wildfires have been difficult for many to handle, causing monumental shifts in people’s lives while limiting access to healthy coping mechanisms.
For example, it is more difficult for people to connect with their social networks, unwind at the spa or gym or even take a leisurely walk around the block.
For people who struggle with mental health issues, these are especially trying times. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has acknowledged that the pandemic may worsen existing mental health conditions, including anxiety and depression. Suicide hotlines in Los Angeles County are reporting several thousand more calls than in previous months.
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LCUSD Diversity Ideas Prompt Dissent, Calls for Caution

More than a month after a diversity, equity and inclusion consultant presented her extensive findings to the La Cañada Unified School District Governing Board, and a week after the LCUSD entrusted Superintendent Wendy Sinnette with overseeing progress on DEI, parents and community members have galvanized over the matter — some in opposition.
Two LCUSD Governing Board members, President Joe Radabaugh and Kaitzer Puglia, have been tabbed to lead a committee that will help frame DEI initiatives, which ultimately will fall to the entire board to approve or not.
In a combined statement last week, Sinnette and Radabaugh emphasized there will be more involved discussion on the topic of any DEI objectives and priorities, saying:
“We listen carefully to all voices in the community and strive for the best possible outcomes. One of the consistent things we heard related to DEI is that we seek more in-depth community input on the objectives and priorities before we finalize and the board approves. We agree with that feedback and feel a DEI committee comprised of a cross-section of the community is a critical means to that end.”
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Church, With City’s Help, Gives Food to 500 Families Today

Photo by Christian Leonard / Burbank Leader
“It’s not about the food,” said volunteer Amy Berger. “It’s about giving people a sense of community, that this is going to be over, but we’re all here to help each other out.”

After weeks of preparation, a local church, in partnership with Burbank’s Department of Parks and Recreation, is giving away food and other supplies to about 500 families today.
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Bar Owners Frustrated Anew as Restrictions Return

Tony Charmello, owner of the Snug, says he doesn’t let anyone else clean the pub. He can’t afford to.
A couple of times a week, he drives from his home near Los Angeles International Airport to Burbank to dust the surfaces or do some repainting at the Snug. Some of his eight employees offered to do the cleaning for him, but Charmello declined. With bars like his closed throughout Los Angeles County and beyond, he doesn’t have the revenue to pay them.
“I feel very sorry for anybody who’s lost their life [from the coronavirus],” he said in a phone interview, “But … I don’t think we can stay closed forever, because a lot of places are going to be in financial hurt, and I’m starting to feel that way a little bit.”
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Al Fresco Eateries as Oases of Economic Hope

Photo by Zane Hill / Glendale News-Press
The city has begun implementing outdoor dining spaces, known popularly as al fresco, as a measure to help restaurants and eateries serve more customers as the COVID-19 pandemic continues.

Those concrete barriers popping up around downtown Glendale and Montrose? For the foreseeable future, they are part of the new normal for restaurants that are now reopening dine-in service to their patrons.
The city this week has been busy setting up K-rail barriers throughout public spaces, later adding tables with umbrellas, chairs and potted plants to make the setting a bit more picturesque. Along Honolulu Avenue in Montrose, the half-dozen al fresco parklets utilize sections of street parking to allow the eateries to spill outdoors to accommodate more customers and make those customers more comfortable as the COVID-19 pandemic persists.
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